Ultrasound

About Us

Welcome! This is the website for the Mount Sinai Emergency Ultrasound Division. It serves as an information resource for residents, fellows, medical students and others seeking information about point-of-care ultrasound. The ultrasound division exists to support our clinicians in caring for patients. Our program has several unique features. First, we care for a diverse population of patients in the greatest city in the world, alongside an amazing group of residents and faculty. Next, we have excellent relationships with other departments, allowing for clinical experiences in transesophageal echocardiography, Cardiology, Radiology, etc. We have a full-time sonographer working in our department, who plays an important role in operations, education, and research. We have many dedicated ultrasound division faculty with enormous experience and dedication to education, including two faculty members at the full professor rank. Our faculty have lectured around the world and held leadership positions in national and international ultrasound organizations.

There is a lot of information here, so please explore the site and send us feedback. To make things easier for new users we’ve condensed some of the highlights here:

Tutorials

We have put together multiple tutorials covering the FAST exam, the RUSH examcardiac ultrasoundobstetricspneumothorax assessment and more. Instructions on using the S-Cath and M-Turbo.

For more academic posts, check out the ultrasound section of our FOAM page.

Rotation

We invite medical students and residents to apply for our ultrasound rotation and see the Manual that serves as our text.

Depending on time of year we also offer ultrasound courses including our: ASM-I medical school course,  Regional CME course, and NYC city-wide resuscitative ultrasound.

YouTube

You can see great POCUS videos on our POCUS4Peds YouTube channel and our SinaiEMultrasound YouTube Channel!

Recent Ultrasound Posts

RUSH

It is now the standard of care to perform focused assessment using sonography for trauma (FAST) early in the evaluation of a sick trauma patient. Historically, there has been far less urgency to use ultrasound to evaluate the medical patient with hypotension or signs of shock. One reason for this discrepancy is the lack of […]