It’s Not a Coma..

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    It’s Not a Coma..

    54 yo F with no PMHx, but admittedly has not been seen by an MD in many years, presents after her daughter visited from our-of-town and found her slightly confused. The patient is disoriented, but able to provide some history. She describes progressive fatigue over several weeks. Vitals signs are remarkable for hypothermia 94F, HR 52, BP 150/90, RR 12, SpO2 100%RA. Exam is notable for AAO2, no focal neuro deficits, prominent facial swelling, and non-pitting lower extremity edema. FS glucose 160. Laboratory analysis is concerning for mild hyponatremia and severe hypothyroidism.

    Myxedema

    This patient is suffering from myxedema coma. Contrary to its name, myxedema coma does not require your patient be in a comatose state. It refers to AMS in the setting of severe hypothyroidism. Additionally, patients may also be hypothermic, bradycardic, hypotensive, hypoglycemic, and hyponatremic. It is important to rule out more common causes of AMS, while keeping hypothyroid high on the differential in this patient. Checking a fingerstick, as always, should be done at arrival in patient’s with new AMS.

    This patient should be admitted and receive IV thyroid replacement. Oral medications may not be fully absorbed secondary to gastrointestinal edema. Finally, myxedema (a dermatologic condition) does not necessarily need to be present in myxedema coma.

    Credit: This article is largely based on http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1403210

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